Posts Tagged ‘Birthdays’

We’ve Got Hurt Feelings

Saturday, June 13th, 2009

Our second run-in with the law was much less pleasant than the first. We left Praha/Prague late Sunday afternoon, the seventh, and drove until 9 or so when we stopped and prepared a birthday feast. Daniel Shenk, 23 years and roughly 10 thousand miles away in Canada, began his preparations for this epic journey and we decided to celebrate. We found a truck stop and began a meal worthy of our birthday boy. Fusilli pasta covered with tomato sauce and fresh tomatoes, onions, and meat. We also enjoyed toast and popcorn and washed it all down with a “cappuccino.” We concluded the birthday festivities by lighting a birthday “candle,” a little excess camping gas. I took the wheel and drove on into the night, crossing into Austria around one. Only David and I were awake at the border where we drove through the dark customs and immigration checkpoint without a second thought. Just another border. I found a rest stop half an hour later and we fell asleep with the promise of showers (our first in a week) in the stop’s facilities the next morning.

Still partially asleep, I stumbles out of the driver’s door at 5:30 Monday morning. I had fallen asleep behind the wheel without reclining the seat and slept fitfully so it merely felt like a dream. I had to adjust my pants on the way out of the seat and I mumbled something incoherent about losing them. I thought the guys were messing around. It took a second before I realized I was standing before two Austrian police officers. I got back in the car. Shenk had also woken and believing he was still dreaming about rendezvousing with some friends, jumped out of the car as well. “Suddenly I realized I wasn’t dreaming and I had to pretend I was doing something intelligent,” he said later. After returning the officer’s curt “Morning,” he put on his jacket and made a show of stretching. I was in the driver’s seat, only awake enough to understand that we hadn’t bought a €1.25 ticket to travel the highway in Austria. I fumbled in the center console for some change. “It’s one-twenty,” intoned one officer, “you can pay by cash or card.” He had to repeat himself twice until I realized he referred to a fine and it was one-hundred and twenty Euro.

Bumbling, I tried to reason with the officer. We had entered the country late and had missed the signs he described that warned of the necessary highway ticket. Apparently you buy them at customs or the next petrol station. He wouldn’t buy my sleepy appeal for mercy. We payed by card. All of us awake now, there was a moment of panic when we realized it was 5:30 a.m. And we we’re sure to whom I had just groggily handed our debit card. Daniel confirmed seeing their cop car so the realization began to set in that we had just significantly contributed to Austria’s GNP. We returned to sleep less than pleased with the Austrian authorities. I’m not sure how this plays into Ephesians 4:26.

We slept in. I woke, admittedly still harboring some animosity toward Austria. We completely unpacked the car, determined to milk our time in the country. It didn’t help that another police car stopped and an officer demanded to see a highway ticket. He seemed a little too disappointed when I pointed to the dash and our €120 ticket. We reorganized the car for the first time since Shenk’s return and enjoyed a shower. Our tag-team approach proved effective and the four of us finished cleansing ourselves with four minutes to spare of the fifteen minutes allotted us. Shenk enjoyed a late birthday present. I enjoyed a shave.

We arrived at Salzburg around noon and set out to witness this city fit for a king (see film below). It was “a literal fountain of fountains.” We climbed to the impressive castle fortress’s walls and walked past Mozart’s home and the cathedral where he was the music director and choir master. There were even lady-folk. The town was nice but we still felt relieved to leave Austria. There were border signs regarding the highway tax, but they were small and in German. Back in Germany, we found Dachau and its concentration camp. The camp was closed so we walked around outside, enjoying the emptiness. I drove out into the countryside and down a little rural road that led to an ideal camping site in a stand of pine trees. I tried out the off-roading capabilities of our overloaded station wagon. We cleared a substantial tree stump and barely avoided two others. A hot meal and we split to the tent and the car to write blog posts and sleep off Austrian wake-up calls. So the next time you drive through Austria, Switzerland, Slovakia, Liechtenstein, or Hungary, may we suggest you buy a highway ticket.

Matt